BETTER AT THE BIN
IS BETTER
FOR THE HOLIDAYS

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Now is the best time to compost food scraps

The holidays are the biggest food weeks of the year. The tons of food scraps generated in San Francisco jump by 17 percent in November and December.

If you compost your food scraps, bravo. If not, the holidays are the best time of year to start composting your coffee grounds, egg shells, vegetable peelings, and other scraps.

 10 reasons to compost

  1. Keeps materials out of landfills. That saves landfill space and reduces landfill gas emissions, such as methane and other potent greenhouse gases.

  2. Returns nutrients and minerals to farms to keep soils fertile.

  3. Promotes microbial activity in topsoil. That switches on the life web in soil, which makes micronutrients available to plant roots and discourages soil diseases. 

  4. Healthy soil equals healthy plants. Healthy plants equal healthy people.

  5. Helps protect top soils from erosion, an increasingly important thing to do.

  6. Saves tremendous amounts of water. That’s because good quality compost is 50 percent humus by weight, and humus is a natural sponge that attracts and retains water. 

  7. Sequesters carbon deep in the soil, especially when used to grow cover crops which shade topsoil and increase photosynthesis.

  8. Creates three times more jobs than landfilling.

  9. Helps cities make great progress toward achieving Zero Waste.

  10. Turns food scraps and plant cuttings into fruits, vegetables, and fine wines. Bon appétit!

 
 

BETTER AT THE BIN
IS BETTER
FOR OUR FUTURE

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 “I don’t want to live on a planet filled with garbage. It’s not that hard to recycle the right way.”

Marlow,14, Western Addition

“I learned at school that we throw away most of the stuff we buy in six weeks.”

Paulina,12, Mission District

“We banned plastic straws. Now let’s ban plastic bottles.”

Bryce,11, Western Addition

“Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees.”

Jean Paul,10, Rohnert Park

 
 
 

THE KIDS GET IT AND THEY WANT
US TO GET IT TOO.
 

We are in a recycling crisis, and our kids know it. They want us ‘grown-ups’ to recycle, compost, and refuse plastic. Recology is right there with them. So, we gave a group of elementary students a big white canvas and recruited Recology’s Artist In Residence alum Sirron Norris to help them cover it with eye-popping recycling inspiration. The students revealed their mobile masterpiece at City Hall and sent it off on its mission to delight and inspire residents to be better recyclers.

 
 

BETTER AT THE BIN
IS BETTER
FOR OUR CITY 

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 BETTER AT THE BIN IS OUR ANSWER TO
THE RECYCLING CRISIS.

We love our city, and being Better At The Bin is a simple way we can all contribute to preserving our picturesque beauty and build on our recycling reputation. To guide us through a few simple recycling actions we called on Zero Waste advocate Kathryn Kellogg. She joins our campaign to host a video, sharing some easy tips and techniques for all of us to be better recyclers and smarter consumers.

THREE SIMPLE THINGS WE CAN ALL DO
TO BE BETTER AT THE BIN.

  1. Empty soda cans and bottles of all liquid. Doing so helps keep paper in recycling bins drier so more paper can be recycled. Higher-quality paper bales generate revenue that comes back to help pay for curbside collection programs. Those economics benefit everyone.

  2. Empty food containers before recycling them. Doing so keeps food out of your recycling bin. When recycling is cleaner, we can recycle more of it.

  3. Compost all food scraps. Coffee grounds, banana peels, vegetable cuttings, even chicken bones. Composting keeps materials out of landfills and returns nutrients to local farms. Compost feeds the soil. That helps farmers grow healthy food that comes to our tables. Farmers even use compost to grow cover crops that pull carbon out of the air and return it to the soil where it belongs. 

 

 BETTER AT THE BIN
IS BETTER
FOR OUR WALLETS

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BE PART OF THE SOLUTION.
REDUCE AND REFUSE SINGLE-USE PLASTICS.

The best thing we can do is reduce the amount of rubbish we create. Here are four painless things we can do to make less garbage. 

  1. Refuse plastics. Refuse plastic bags, plastic straws and other plastics whenever possible.

  2. Carry a metal water bottle. Doing so can save you $200 a year.

  3. Carry a (metal) travel mug. We don’t need single-use coffee cups, and coffee shops often offer discounts to people who bring their own travel mug.

  4. Carry canvas bags when shopping. No plastic bag required, and stores give discounts to people who bring their own bag

 

BETTER AT THE BIN
IS BETTER TOGETHER

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 WE ARE DROWNING IN GARBAGE.

 

We are at the tipping point for waste creation. The statistics are staggering. At Recology, we see the solution is all of us working together to be better recyclers and smarter consumers. That inspired our Better At The Bin inititative.

Globally we produce 3.5 million tons of trash a day.
Recycle, compost, and buy only what you need. 

The oceans now contain 25 trillion pieces of plastic debris.
Refuse plastic. 

Globally we consume 1 million plastic bags a minute.
Switch to canvas bags and reusable containers.

America is home to more than 3,000 landfills.
If you’re not going to recycle or reuse it, don’t buy it.

In America 40 percent of food is wasted.
Get a kitchen compost pail and start composting.

 Globally we use 500 billion plastic water bottles a year.
Switch to a metal water bottle. It will save you $200 a year.

 Nearly one-third of the waste generated in the U.S. is product packaging.
Buy loose fruits and vegetables at farmers’ markets. 

Roughly one-third of the food produced in the world every year is wasted.
Buy only what you need. Compost all your food scraps. 

Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees.
Let no paper go to landfill. 

Recycling creates 10 times more jobs than landfilling or incineration.
Recycle. 

Whales, fish, and other sea animals eat or get tangled in plastic bags and die.
Switch to reusable canvas bags. 

China recycles 30 percent of discarded plastic, Europe 22 percent,
the United States, 9 percent.
Refuse plastic. 

The average American generates 4.4 pounds of trash a day, the most of any country.
Reduce, reuse, recycle…and refuse plastic.

Most of the material buried in landfills should have been recycled or composted.
Be Better At The Bin.

 
 

FOR MORE RECYCLING GUIDANCE AND INFORMATION VISIT

RECOLOGY.COM

 

IT’S TIME TO BE BETTER RECYCLERS AND SMARTER CONSUMERS.

IT’S TIME TO BE
BETTER AT THE BIN.

 

MEDIA CONTACT
Robert Reed
Recology
rreed@recology.com
Cell (415) 606-9183

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